Posted over 2 years ago
tlnt.co/p/RN

Bump Wordpress! IMHO, Programmers should start looking at Octopress for their coding blogs.

Pros

  • Leverage github's CDN vs Paying for you hosting
  • [If you don't get to use it at work] Use some ruby for your blog
  • Have some decent looking themes!

You might also like

Octopress: A Blogging Framework for Hackers
Octopress: A Blogging Framework for Jekyll
Why WordPress needs to get Decoupled

Comments

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Abelardo Gonzalez

This is very, very tempting. :)

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Arlo Carreon

Tell me about it! I dare my wife to do a girls night out, so I can migrate my blog!! ;)

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Nick Peelman

Coincidentally, I spent a little bit of time messing with this today, both Jekyll (what Octo is based on) and Octo itself.

I really want to move towards a "baked" website, since by-and-large my Wordpress-as-a-CMS is mostly unnecessary given how rarely the content changes and the fact that I've started posting anything too-long-for-twitter to Tumblr instead, but neither of these is really what I want.

Why does "for nerds" or "for hackers" always have to mean "stupid-hard to maintain" and "complex enough that you need to sink more time into it than a hobby site is worth."

I switched away from Windows to get AWAY from shit like this.

I'm waiting on something native to solve this problem. Something like iWeb crossed with MarsEdit. Tools like Coda and Espresso are great for code editing, but suck at letting you use a template, manage a set of content pages, and "bake" the site. Doing a global find-and-replace to edit a link in a set of static pages doesn't really work for me. Changing a template file, clicking a button and having all the HTML regenerated would.

Perhaps such a tool exists, and perhaps it doesn't suck; i have yet to find it yet though :\

Edit: I used RapidWeaver long ago, and wasn't impressed. I just downloaded the latest version and the lack of impression stands. I need something that isn't for HTML/CSS noobs, but I'm not looking for a "nerd" solution either, at least not as Octopress defines it.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 2 likes  
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Arlo Carreon

I know what you mean. That's why I've been stuck on wordpress. Simple enough for me to findangle with.

I think octopress is "easy"/"time saving" for those who mess with ruby, yaml and sass on a day to day. Otherwise it is "stupid-hard".

Unfortunately, I do not mess with this stuff on a day to day. So I know I'll have a barrier of entry, but I really like the feeling of accomplishment when I actually get something like this working. After giving up on a lot of "geek" stuff simply because it's not easy, I start feeling less geek.

Anyways, if you ever find something work using for a blog system let me know. I would be interested.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 2 likes  
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Nick Peelman

I agree that if you were buried under Ruby, YAML, and SASS, it would probably give perspective on how easy / difficult this is.

On that note, I want to clarify that Octopress itself isn't stupid hard; but i hate having to mess with RVM, gems, etc., on my local machine, especially as a non-ruby dev who deals with the crap so infrequently I have to re-learn the entire spiel every time I want to mess with it. Jekyll was less painful, as it just installed and doesn't appear to be so bloody picky about Ruby versions. From an ease-of-use/ease-of-administration standpoint, Ruby still blows the big one, I don't care how pretty the code is. Apache's PHP integration is so simple its border line retarded now. Ruby and Rails' systems for testing / deployment are getting better, but are still far to complex for simpler tasks; put another way: if you don't do it full time, there are too many things that you don't know or can't keep up with.

The BYO-Editor approach is a nice idea too, but having to manually manage specific (and error-prone) file names, do a block of gibberish at the top of every post to maintain the meta data, etc., that's all stuff that a nice wrapper should be taking care of and making seamless.

If i were to use it, I would be duplicating an old file, renaming it, and clearing the contents, then editing the meta block. Nerdy perhaps, but painful enough that I'm not going to undertake the work (for what's supposed to be a fun side project) of setting it up, migrating, and continuing to use it. And in saying that, like you point out, I feel "less geek," but I've been slowly coming to terms with the fact that I'm tired of coming home and having to work more. As my 20s come to a close, I'm wanting to escape away from tech more and more; BUT i still want to maintain a personal site and write the occasional rant.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Jared Brown

I'll just throw this out there. Have you tried/considered Dreamweaver? I used its templates back in high school (late 90's) with some success.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Nick Peelman

Considered? Yes. Seriously? No. Contribute is the same way. They both abstract away too much.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Jared Brown

Like Arlo I'd be interested in hear if you find a satisfying solution.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Nick Peelman

I've all but concluded that they only way that will happen is if I write my own; not something I'm inclined to do (yet, at least). My most recent dev job has burned me out on dev, and almost tech-in-general.

That said, I've got a pretty good set of notes outlined for what I want, so if I ever start on it... Doing something based on WordPress that stays more true to it's name is also a possibility. The thought of a web-based system that can handle the templating and management is quite appealing, though a kick-ass native Cocoa app would be much cooler.

I'm still holding out for Espresso or Coda to add some kind of templating and/or CMS functionality. They have the biggest lead in the editor and server integration.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Arlo Carreon

For the sake of putting it out there.

Have you tried iWeb? They have basic templates, but you can edit your page locally on a GUI and then iWeb pushes your changes to a server [via ftp].

I know of a handful of people that like to maintain their site through iWeb.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Nick Peelman

Yep. Same deal as Contribute and Dreamweaver (and FrontPage).

I actually have used iweb for some things, but it's still a tool for people like my mother.

Once again, I ask: why can't nerds have and enjoy pretty interfaces and automation that isn't command line driven, but isn't boiled down so much that the power and usefulness is kneecapped in the name of ease-of-use for a antigeeks. Coda and Espresso aren't editors for the web-stupid, but they're not pico and emacs either.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Abelardo Gonzalez

Rapid Weaver is good after you've created the theme, but you would need to download the SDK and create your themes separately. I've done it a few times, but it tends to be a pain, and I never got it to upload only the changed files properly.

Have you tried Pulse or Expression?

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Nick Peelman

I have not. I can't find Expression or Pulse. Searches gather more noise than useful for either of those, can you link us? I'm curious to see more.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Abelardo Gonzalez

Expression is Microsofts successor to FrontPage. Much better than frontpage, and I've used it a lot. Free trial: http://www.microsoft.com/expression/try-it/

Pulse: http://pulsecms.com/ . Free trial, costs $. There is another one I'm looking for that seems to fit what you want perfectly. Can never remember the name. goes searches

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Nick Peelman

I was hoping you were talking about something else. Windows-only doesn't work in my case. Pulse looks nice, but I'm weary about what I see on their site.

Edit: to elaborate on Pulse: Pulse doesn't appear to generate static content. It's doing rudimentary (read: FAST) PHP includes to glue a site together, which is fine, but its not what I'm looking for.

I keep circling back to the idea that I could probably spend a couple of days and get my own publishing platform up and functioning in a rough state in PHP, but doing things like Markdown parsing, etc, isn't in my wheelhouse.

As it is, I'm whittling down the reasons to keep my Wordpress site up at all; I point my domain at Tumblr, and subdomain it for file / image hosting, and let Tumblr soak it up if I get Fireballed or Slashdotted (in the hideously unlikely event that were to ever happen).

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Dave Everitt

If I understand this correctly, sounds like you need a static site generator that takes (say) text files in Markdown and converts them via templates into a static site, which is what Webby does. However, it's developer is looking for a successor on GitHub, although people are still using it happily, so Nanoc might be a more future-proof choice for a 'baked' site-generator.

As an alternative, mini-cms Nesta doesn't do exactly that, but it might work for you and integrates with Sinatra, although the tutorials presume stuff for geeks like RVM, which can be hard to set up and maintain.

Talking of frameworks, it might be better - if you decide to make your own project to meet these requirements - to use something really minimal like Camping, or (for a free admin backend and more doodads) Django. But nanoc looks best, and if you already use PHP, Ruby is a lovely language to add to your skills.

But you definitely have a point with the for non-geeks issue. I mess with loads of things, and tend to dig deep with some, but was extremely annoyed when I tried to install Node.js that the installation docs completely fail to point out that I need a 64-bit system for starters. That wasted almost 2 days, and was resolved (negatively) by a post to the forum.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Nick Peelman

@Dave that's one thing most open source projects (the ones I'm involved in included) fail miserably at, is documentation. As the / a developer, its often easy to overlook things you take for granted; gems you have installed, packages you installed a year ago, that all impact how things work on your development environment.

As for your suggestions; thanks, but i defer to my previous statements. Webby looks promising, but its still CLI driven.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Jared Brown

It seems like it would be fairly easy to wrap a GUI around the CLI. Have you looked at Tcl/Tk? That would be a good candidate for making the GUI.

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Dave Everitt

@Jared - my thoughts exactly - even just a web-based gui admin for the markdown (or whatever) could make - say - nanoc into a nice little micro-cms. Now there's a nice little collaborative project...

over 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Jared Brown

Inspired by this discussion thread we discussed CMS offerings in Episode 23 of the Talentopoly Podcast.

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Nick Peelman

@Jared, nice, thanks for the name drop :)

For reference, here is the post i made around the time we started this discussion. More relevant links to the sources of my original search are in there, as well as a slightly-more-concise outline of what this thing might look like.

To follow up on Jared's GUI comment, I have thought about that; right now though, I'm more likely to make a PHP/HTML-based solution rather than going the Tcl route. I had my fair share of that at Purdue doing network simulations (groan), if i never have to use tickle again, I'll die happy.

I really want to do a Cocoa app; but every time I start to think about writing it, I wind up having visions of that guy from Event Horizon (click at your own risk).

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 2 likes  
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Jared Brown

I think you should resolve in 2012 to start making this. ;)

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Nick Peelman

If only wishing made it so. Once my income re-stabilizes, if a job I don't hate allows me to regain some sanity, I might attempt it.

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Abelardo Gonzalez

I found it! CMSimple. Flatfile CMS, and pretty straight forward. I also found razorCMS while looking.

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Dave Everitt

Took a look at CMSimple (do I spy markup tables?) and RazorCMS... went to the latter's front end demo and saw:

razorCMS demo fail

With time at such a premium, one glitch like that puts me off. But both nice ideas...

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 3 likes  
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Jared Brown

Yea, an Internal Server Error is a good reason to stay away. The CMSimple page wasn't too impressive either.

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 2 likes  
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Abelardo Gonzalez

FWIW, I used Razor for a project anyway, And just spent a week re-making the site from scratch. It's theming is kinda wonky.

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Jared Brown

Has anyone tried out Second Crack? It's Marco Arment's (former CTO of Tumblr, founder of Instapaper) personal CMS that he has made public for others to use at their peril. ;)

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Nick Peelman

I forked it on Github right after he released it, and glanced at it, but didn't get very deep into it yet. It holds promise. I'm not Marco's biggest fan for a number of reasons, but I do admire most of his work.

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 2 likes  
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Dave Everitt

Now I've discovered another use for Dropbox - on the server! Didn't know about that...

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Jared Brown

There are so many great uses of Dropbox.

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  
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Jared Brown

I'm trying to get Dave on an episode of the podcast so we can have an Ultimate CMS Shootout. ;)

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Nick Peelman

Now that is an idea.

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 0 likes  
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Dave Everitt

I'd better start gathering material...

about 2 years ago   Like_icon 1 likes  

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